Archives

#123 - jun 14th 2015

Look

Examples of UI/UX, graphic performance, web design and flashy things.
Uber brand guidelines design
Very professional branding guidelines, with very neat website effects

Use

Web applications, resources and tools, available for making our life easier or funnier.
Rails Security Strategy Guide rb
(book) How to increase Rails security with mini habits.
Handwriting tool
Real handwriting without the pen.
Videvo design
Free Stock Footage and Motion Graphics.

Install

A selection of gems or applications updated during past week.
Glasses rb
A micro search framework to be used within Ruby web applications.
method_hooks rb
Add before, around, and after callbacks to any method.
xkcdize rb
XKCD-like picture distortion in Ruby and RMagick.
Clusterize.js js
Tiny plugin to display large data sets easily.
Summon ops
Command-line tool that injects secrets as environment variables into any process.

Read

From the blogosphere or news feeds ...
RubyConf Taiwan 2015 is calling for speakers jun 4 rb
Rubyconf Taiwan will be held on 9/11-9/12, it's now calling for papers.
Puppet in Docker jun 7 ops
Proper Puppet master-slave setup in Docker containers, for testing purposes.
How Arel Converts Ruby Queries Into SQL Statements jun 8 rb
Low-level binging between ActiveRecord and Arel.
Organizing Data: Replace Array with Object jun 8 rb
Truns Hash or Array options as configuration object.
Refactoring to Reveal Rails Group_by jun 9 rb
How and when to use group_by in rails.
On OpenSCAP and Foreman jun 9 ops
Run automated vulnerability audits on your foreman hosts.
The Difference Between Throttling and Debouncing jun 10 js
Ways to limit the amount of JavaScript you are executing based on DOM events for performance reasons.
The Future Generation of CSS Selectors: Level 4 jun 10 css3
The future of CSS selectors is also looking bright, with the Selectors Level 4 specification currently in Working Draft status.
How We Moved Our API From Ruby to Go and Saved Our Sanity jun 10 web
When the “one process per request” part of the Rails model started to fall apart.
What’s New in Rails 5 jun 11 rb
Rails 5 is right around the corner (currently targeting Fall 2015) and there are some exciting features coming up.
AngularJS Testing: Bootstrap Blocks, Routes, Events, and Animations jun 11 js
AngularJS makes testing the code written using the framework easier by supporting features like Dependency Injection.
A Simple Gulp’y Workflow For Sass jun 11 web
Improve the compilation time with Gulp

Watch

Screencasts and conferences videos, or other video feeds ...
Continuous Acceleration (46m) jun 8 ops
Why Continuous Everything Requires A Supply Chain Approach.
RedDot Ruby Conf 2015 (25 videos) jun 10 rb
Talks at RedDot Ruby Conf in Singapore.
Supercharging page load (100 Days of Google Dev) (11m) jun 10 web
Making simple changes to Service Worker can vastly improve the startup and load performance of your web site
Links curated by mose (publisher), xenor, tysliu (editors) .

Rant

The random rant of the week by mose.

A word about project gardening

In the last 2 companies where I worked, there was this recurring issue. Actually I noticed it for a while but for some reasons it became more obvious to me with time passing. The project management role is usually badly fulfilled.

But at some point, and even from the point of view of a developer, there is in projects the need for a dedicated person for doing some gardening. Yeah it's all about daily ungrateful clearing the bad weeds, making sure the soil is rich enough, and that the seeds are all planted where they should be planted, that soil pH is adequate for this or that variety. Having someone that is just doing moderation on projects also frees the productive people from lengthly and sometimes non technical meetings. It is the occasion to have someone that keeps track of specs, sometimes gather them or (re)write them down in a central place.

The problem in the transition from waterfall to agile, is that in the waterfall model there is a hierarchic feeling in the role of the project manager. The Management word into it is misleading. It leads the developers to frown upon it. I have the impression that in agile teams, project management is supposed to be taken care of organically by the dev teams, sometimes by the scrum master or whatever facilitator is there for enforcing the agile process. Or the product owner will be technical enough to fill up that role. More or less.

But the reality is that project grooming is a full time job that may have to be re-invented. It certainly should take in account developers creativity and pertinence in the match of the objectives with the technical realities. But it's necessary to have a person that is the reference on keeping track of the need and follow the quality process at all the stages. Well, at least when you begin to get many developers and many projects, and developers that work on many projects.

I think it's a question of scale. Companies with less than 30 people may never face that need because there is a natural fluidity internally and not that many projects. But when you get to 100 and you still don't have people dedicated to projects, then you can see developers burning out. Projects become lousy because nobody has time to write specs. You also can see emergence of hero coders that can by miracle make it all happen. But you will postpone the problem because heroes are not scalable and can even be toxic on the long run (as any experienced practitioner already knows).

Personally in my technical career I never liked the project managers that I met. But that is a long time I didn't meet any. It dates from an age where agile was not there yet. But now that I don't see them anymore, I feel that something is missing. It certainly exists in various places. And I can bet that many of them are as bad as they were in the last century. But maybe there is a new species of project curators out there that I didn't meet yet. I read about those in various places, but in my (small) world, this is still a mythical beast.

Green Ruby News is a feed of fresh links of the week about ruby, javascript, webdev, devops, collected by mose, xenor and tysliu every sunday.

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